I’m delighted to say that my joint publication with Professor Jackie Marsh, ‘Digital Literacies in Early Childhood’ has been published in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education.

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The Oxford Research Encyclopedias

As anyone involved in teaching (or, indeed, researching) in HE is well aware, the proliferation of information readily accessible online presents a serious challenge to quality research. The Oxford Research Encyclopedias draw on expert authors to provide readers with a reliable understanding of an unfamiliar topic. Each article is peer-reviewed in line with the rigorous quality standards associated with Oxford publications, but currently freely available online. Tim Allen, Acquisitions Editor for Oxford University Press, Education discusses the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education HERE.

Digital Literacies in Early Childhood

The study of digital literacies in early childhood (0–8 years) is an emergent and fast-growing area of scholarship. Young children’s communicative practices are today more complex and diverse in scope than ever before, encompassing both “traditional” reading and writing and a growing range of “new” communicative competencies across multiple digital media contexts. Scholars are increasingly interested in children’s literacy practices outside traditional print-based texts, and the theory of multimodality helps them to understand children’s communicative practices in relation to a range of modes, including those present in digital technology.

At the same time, the boundaries between what constitutes “digital” and “traditional” literacies are themselves blurred. Multiple academic disciplines have contributed to our understanding of children’s digital literacy practices. Numerous definitions for digital literacy or literacies exist, and scholars have proposed a range of theoretical approaches to the topic.

Our publication employs Bill Green’s “3D model” of literacy to explore the operational, cultural, and critical domains of young children’s digital literacy, paying particular attention to the differences between accepted literacy practices in schools and early years’ settings and children’s literacy practices in a socioculturally diverse range of home settings. We also consider gaps and absences in the existing literature, pointing to the areas it will be important for scholars to research over the coming years.

Read the full publication HERE.